Conference Program

UPDATE: Because of safety concerns over the coronavirus in New York and the declaration of a state of emergency by New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo, Fordham University leadership has cancelled all events on its campuses, including “Medieval French without Borders.” The Center for Medieval Studies is now evaluating the possibility of rescheduling the event next year. 

Saturday, March 21, 2020

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. – Registration and Coffee

9:00 – 9:15 a.m. – Welcome – Scott G. Bruce, Interim Director of the Center for Medieval Studies, Fordham University

9:15 – 10:15 p.m. – Plenary I – 12th Floor Lounge

Wolfgang Haubrichs, Universität des Saarlandes
Rustica Romana Lingua and Theotisca Lingua: Early Medieval Multilingualism and Contacts between Gallo-Romance and Germanic in the Regions of the Rivers Rhine, Moselle and Meuse
Chair: Elizabeth M. Tyler, University of York

10:30 a.m – 12:00 p.m.  – Session 1: Concurrent Sessions

1A: FRENCH LITERATURE, FRANCE, AND THE EMPIRE
Panel sponsored by the Department of French Literature, Thought and Culture, NYU
Chair: Sarah Kay, New York University

Introduction and Rationale
Sarah Kay, New York University

The Transmission of Medieval French Literature to German-Speaking Regions
Keith Busby, University of Wisconsin–Madison

The Presence of French in German Courtly Literature ca. 1200
Mark Chinca, University of Cambridge

1B: GLOBAL MEDIEVAL FRENCH: LANGUAGES OF THE LOCAL AND THE UNIVERSAL
Chair: Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, University of Pittsburgh

Old French and Polemical Multilingualism in Fourteenth-Century Cyprus
Uri Shachar, Ben-Gurion University

A Barnacle Goose by any Other Name: Language and Cultural Relativism in The Livre des merveilles du monde of Sir John Mandeville
Christine Bourgeois, University of Kansas

‘Zo Gaston, traïtour’: Froissart and the Menace of Occitan
Andrew Taylor, University of Ottawa

1C: FRENCH AND THE MULTILINGUAL LITERARY CULTURE OF MEDIEVAL FLANDERS
Chair: Jane Gilbert, University College London

The Multilingual Literary Culture of Medieval Flanders: An Introduction
Bart Besamusca, Utrecht University

Selon que ma linque que flamenque pour justement rimer en roumans’. History writing in multilingual political and social contexts: the case of the ‘Chronique rimée des troubles de Flandre’
Lisa Demets, Ghent University

In or of? Towards a Literary History of French and Flanders
David Murray, Utrecht University

12:00 – 1:30 p.m. – Lunch – (list of local restaurants provided)

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. – Plenary II – 12th Floor Lounge

Teresa Shawcross, Princeton University 
From Liutprand of Cremona to Robert de Clari: Wonder and the Translation of Knowledge Before and After the Crusader Conquest of Constantinople 

Chair: George E. Demacopoulos, Fordham University 

2:45 – 4:15 p.m. – Session 2: Concurrent Session

2A: HISTORY, ROMANCE, AND AUTHORSHIP
Panel Sponsored by the Centre for Medieval Literature, a Danish Centre of Excellence
Chair: Christopher Baswell, Barnard College and Columbia University

Writing Women into History: Gaimar’s Estoire des engleis and Romance
Elizabeth Tyler, University of York

The Rise of French Prose and the Forces of Anonymity
Lars Boje Mortensen, University of Southern Denmark

Fictitious Communities and Textual Transmission. The Case of Pseudonymity in Arthurian Prose Romances
Nicola Morato, University of Liège

2B: CODICOLOGY IN CONTACT
Chair: Brigitte Bedos-Rezak, New York University

French Literary Manuscripts in England, 1100-1500: A Quantitative Approach
Krista A. Murchison, Leiden University

Looking French: A Comparative Codicology of Multilingual Flemish Manuscripts
Jenneka Janzen, Utrecht University

Bilingual Books and Trilingual tales. Multilingual Multi-Text Manuscripts from Medieval Flanders
Jelmar Hugen, Utrecht University

2C: A VERNACULAR FOR LEARNING
Chair: Maryanne Kowaleski, Fordham University

Encyclopedic French as a Multilingual Contact Zone
Luke Sunderland, Durham University

Through the vernacular to the truth. Jewish apologietic and dialogic register in the French Livre of Moses ben Abraham (1244)
Maria Teresa Rachetta, King’s College London

‘Mes cest romanz a laie gent / Assez suffit plenerement’: Computus texts and the languages of knowledge in 13th century England
Edward Mills, University of Exeter

4:15 – 4:45 p.m. – Coffee Break

4:45 – 6:15 p.m. – Session 3: Concurrent Sessions

3A: BREAKING NEW INTELLECTUAL GROUND IN HOSPITALLER CYPRUS
Chair: Brian Reilly, Fordham University

De plusors et diverses choses: The Livre Saterian and the Francophone Cultures of Crusader Cyprus
Laura K. Morreale, Independent Scholar

Rhetorical invention in Outremer: Chantilly, Musée Condé 433
Rosa M. Rodríguez Porto, University of Southern Denmark
Julian Yolles, University of Southern Denmark

3B: FRENCH STORIES IN IRISH? THE CASE OF THE COLLOQUY OF THE ANCIENTS
Chair: Thomas O’Donnell, Fordham University

In Dialogue with Normans: The Norman Presence in Ireland and Cultural Change
Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, University of Cambridge

Physical and Literary Landscapes: Itineraries in Acallam na Senórach and Norman Sites
Anne Connon, Ohio Dominican University

Outsiders in Acallam na Senórach and the positing of French literary influence on the text
Geraldine Parsons, University of Glasgow

3C: MEDIEVAL FRENCH OUT OF PLACE?
Chair: Ardis Butterfield, Yale University

Sounding the Cult of St. Nicholas: The Meeting of French and Latin in Hagiographic Song and Drama
Mary Channen Caldwell, University of Pennsylvania 

Translating the Bisclavret: the Strengleikar and King Hákon Hákonarson’s Francophile Court
Sean Spillane, Fordham University 

French in the Crown of Aragon: Code-Switching in Guillem de Torroella’s La Faula
Ana Pairet, Rutgers University – New Brunswick  

6:30 – 7:30 p.m. – Reception

Sunday, March 22, 2020

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. –  Registration and Coffee

9:00 – 10:30 a.m. – Session 4: Concurrent Sessions

4A: FRENCH IN THE HEBREW-SPEAKING WORLD
Chair: Magda Teter, Fordham University

A Foreign Nature: Old French Glosses in Berechiah Ha-Nakdan’s Uncle and Nephew
Ruth Nisse, Wesleyan University

Mixed Metaphors, Mixed Forms: Across Medieval Hebrew and French Prosimetra
Isabelle Levy, Columbia University 

Stories without Borders: French-to-Hebrew Literary Translation in Late Medieval Europe
Caroline Gruenbaum, Yale University

4B: MAKING AND CROSSING BORDERS
Chair: Felisa Baynes-Ross, Yale University

Textual Contact in Gaimar’s Estoire des Engleis
Hannah Weaver, Columbia University 

Transnational Romance: The romans antiques in the Later Middle Ages
Venetia Bridges, Durham University

Le Mirouer des simples âmes and the Byways of Linguistic Dislocation
Chase Padusniak, Princeton University 

10:45 – 12:15 p.m. – Session 5: Concurrent Sessions

5A: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON FRENCH IN MEDIEVAL BRITAIN
Chair: Hal Momma, New York University

Denis Piramus’ La Vie de Seint Edmund: A Case for a Transitory Anglo-Norman Identity
Gabriela Faundez-Rojas, University of Miami

The French of Wales? Possibilities, Problems, Implications
Matt Lampitt, St John’s College, University of Cambridge

Brittonic Names in Twelfth-Century French Romance: Evidence of Written Transmission?
Joshua Byron Smith, University of Arkansas

5B: BORDERS IN EARLY MODERN FRENCH? FRANCE, FLANDERS, AND THE LOW COUNTRIES
Chair: Francesca Canadé Sautman, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY

‘En translacion de langage francoiz’. French targets in the Burgundian translation zone
Dirk Schoenaers, Leiden University

Francophone or Francophobe? Ambivalent Attitudes Towards French in the Sixteenth-Century Low Countries
Alisa van de Haar, Leiden University

How France Stole French from the Habsburgs: The Valois and Habsburg Dukes of Burgundy and the Elevation of the French Language, 14th-16th centuries
Paul Cohen, University of Toronto

5C: ANCIENT HISTORY IN MEDITERRANEAN CITIES AND COURTS
Chair: Susanna Barsella, Fordham University

‘Dize en la estoria francesa’: The Circulation of Francophone Matter of Antiquity in Medieval Castile (c. 1200-1369)
Clara Pascual-Argente, Rhodes College

Ernoul-Bernard’s Chronique and the Eracles in Italy: manuscripts, translations and adaptations
Massimiliano Gaggero, University of Milan

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. – Concluding Roundtable 

Chair: Thelma Fenster, Fordham University

Anne-Hélène Miller, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Karla Mallette, University of Michigan
Sara Poor, Princeton University
Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Fordham University 

1:30 p.m. – Lunch